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Calculate your mortgage from AXA now.

Mortgages

You want to realize the dream of your own home? Then plan the long-term financing of your own four walls with a mortgage from AXA now! Calculate your personal interest costs and choose a mortgage that you can afford over the long term.

  • Mortgage calculator: Residential dreams in numbers
  • Suitable repayment options
  • Careful loan policy with clear guidelines

Mortgage products from AXA

In order to finance your own home appropriately, you can choose from three different mortgage products from AXA: a fixed-rate mortgage, a variable-rate mortgage, or a LIBOR mortgage. Do you prefer stability or flexibility? It’s up to you!

1. Fixed-rate mortgage
You prefer to know your costs in advance? Then the fixed-rate mortgage is the right product for you. With a fixed-rate mortgage, you fix the interest rate and the term when you take out the mortgage. Hence, you will always pay the same mortgage interest, but cannot benefit from any fall in mortgage interest rates. You can choose a term of between 1 and 15 years, depending on the loan amount. 

The minimum amount of a fixed-rate mortgage is CHF 100,000.

2. LIBOR mortgage:
Do you want to benefit more quickly from falling mortgage interest rates while accepting the risk that interest rates may rise? Then the LIBOR mortgage is exactly right for you.

With a LIBOR mortgage, the money market is used as the source of financing: The interest rate is derived from LIBOR (the interest rate from London interbank trading, the London Interbank Offered Rate) plus an individual client margin. On taking out the mortgage, you opt for an overall term of 3 or 5 years. Within the overall term, the interest rate is modified at regular intervals specified in advance.

AXA offers the LIBOR mortgage starting from CHF 1,000,000.

3. Variable-rate mortgage
The variable-rate mortgage is ideal for homeowners who expect interest rates to fall but can accept the risk that rates may rise. This means that with a variable-rate mortgage you are not tied to a fixed interest rate or a specific term.

The product is also suitable for homeowners who would like to remain financially flexible (e.g. when planning to sell their own home).

  • Teaser Image
    Keep your own home even under difficult circumstances

    Unexpected events such as illness, an accident, or a death can result in a drop in your income and thereby put your mortgage at risk. A lower income following retirement can also lead to financial bottlenecks. In a worst-case scenario, your home would have to be sold. Protect yourself with life insurance now.

    To life insurance

Financing example

What mortgage cost is right for you?

What mortgage cost is right for you?

The financial cost of your own home should be affordable over the long term. The running costs of your own home should not exceed one third of your gross annual income. An example is included here of how you can properly estimate your financial options.

  1. Statement of costs
  2. Purchase price CHF 600,000
  3. Own funds (at least 20% of the purchase price) CHF 120,000
  4. Borrowed capital (maximum 80% of the purchase price) CHF 480,000
  5. Costs
  6. Average interest rate of 5.0% for 1st mortgage (66.67% of the purchase price) CHF 20,000
  7. Average interest rate of 5.5% for 2nd mortgage (13.33% of the purchase price) CHF 4,400
  8. Amortization of 2nd mortgage (within 15 years) CHF 5,335
  9. Annual ancillary costs / maintenance (approx. 1% of the purchase price) CHF 6,000
  10. Total annual costs CHF 35,735
  11. Total monthly costs CHF 2,978

Have you any questions? We are there for you.

In German:
Phone: +41 58 215 33 18

In Italian:
Phone: +41 58 215 33 15

AXA Winterthur
Mortgage Center / W0.164
General-Guisan-Strasse 40
P.O. Box 357
CH-8401 Winterthur
Phone: +41 58 215 44 01
Email: info.hypothek@axa-winterthur.ch

In French:
Phone: +41 58 215 34 01

AXA Winterthur
Centre hypothécaire / DD-1.662
Case postale 7753
1002 Lausanne
Tel: +41 58 215 38 46
Email: centrehypo@axa.ch

Support and frequently asked questions

  • How much of my own capital do I need to invest?

    AXA uses the 20:80 rule: You invest at least 20% of the purchase price of your own home yourself. You may finance a maximum of 80% using borrowed capital (1st and 2nd mortgages). The higher the portion of your own invested capital, the lower your interest payments.

  • How do I repay my mortgage?

    Mortgage repayment is normally split across two different mortgages:

    • The 1st mortgage generally corresponds to 66.67% of the purchase price of your own home. For tax reasons it can make sense not to repay the 1st mortgage for a while.
    • The 2nd mortgage covers the remainder of the borrowed capital, usually 13.33%. This must be repaid in full within 15 years or at the latest by your 60th birthday.
  • How do I draw up a sensible budget?

    The running costs for your own home should not exceed one third of your gross annual income. These costs include the interest on the 1st and 2nd mortgages, the ancillary costs and the repayments for the 2nd mortgage.

  • For what own homes does AXA grant mortgages?
    • The owner's primary residence
    • Single-family houses and residential apartments with a broad market appeal and good resale potential

    The minimum mortgage amount is CHF 400,000.

  • For what investment properties does AXA grant mortgages?
    • Principally residential, office and business properties that are rented out to third parties, have broad market appeal and good resale potential
    • Short-term vacancy rate of max. 5–10%
    • Gastronomy/commercial/industry share of the rental income comprises a maximum of 30%

    Here, a minimum mortgage amount of CHF 800,000 applies.

  • For what properties does AXA not grant mortgages?
    • Construction land / construction projects
    • Vacation properties (vacation chalets/apartments/houses)
    • Properties abroad
    • The financing of subordinate mortgages
    • Properties financed with the help of the Swiss confederation under the WEG (Law Promoting the Construction and Ownership of Housing)
    • Properties in bad condition
    • Properties for resale
    • Special-purpose properties, e.g. agricultural, schools, residential homes, hotels, gastronomy, commercial, industry
    • Borrowers with questionable or non-transparent creditworthiness – borrowers and/or properties for which legal enforcement measures apply
  • What happens to my mortgage if I die?

    Your heirs must accept a sudden loss of earnings if you die. This loss of earnings puts the mortgage at risk. In a worst-case scenario, your home would have to be sold. With whole life insurance you can prevent this, as it allows your heirs to reduce the mortgage debt. The interest payments from the remaining income thereby remain affordable.